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Gone are the Days of Unfulfilled Political Promises, Empty Gestures and Worthless Symbolism. We're Demanding a Specific Black Agenda to Address Specific Harms and Specific Damages, Suffered by the Black American Descendants of Chattel Slavery.

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you dare to win."

- Fred Hampton

Tulsa, OK - “Black Wall Street”

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During the oil boom of the 1910s, the area of northeast Oklahoma around Tulsa flourished, including the Greenwood neighborhood, which came to be known as “the Black Wall Street.” The area was home to several lawyers, realtors, doctors, and prominent black Businessmen, many of them multimillionaires. 

Greenwood boasted a variety of thriving businesses such as grocery stores, clothing stores, barbershops, banks, hotels, cafes, movie theaters, two newspapers, and many contemporary homes. Greenwood residents enjoyed many luxuries that their white neighbors did not, including indoor plumbing and a remarkable school system. The dollar circulated 36 to 100 times, sometimes taking a year for currency to leave the community.

The neighborhood was destroyed during a riot that broke out after a group men from Greenwood attempted to protect a young Black man from a lynch mob. On the night of May 31, 1921, a  mob called for the lynching of Dick Rowland, a Black man who shined shoes, after reports spread that on the previous day he had assaulted Sarah Page, a white woman, in the elevator she operated in a downtown building.

In the early morning hours of June 1, 1921, Black Tulsa was looted, firebombed from the air and burned down by white rioters. The governor declared martial law, and National Guard troops arrived in Tulsa. Guardsmen assisted firemen in putting out fires, removed abducted African-Americans from the hands of white vigilantes, and imprisoned all Black Tulsans, not already confined, into a prison camp at the Convention Hall and the Fairgrounds, some for as long as eight days.

In the wake of the violence, 35 city blocks lay in charred ruins, over 800 people were treated for injuries and estimated 300 deaths occurred.

In October 2018 Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum announced that the city would reexamine the potential mass graves that were identified in the 2001 report. A year later, the Oklahoma Archeological Survey from the University of Oklahoma conducted scans at three of the four locations. And this week, the leading scientists from OU, Scott W. Hammerstedt and Amanda L. Regnier, revealed that they had found anomalies that are consistent with mass graves at “The Canes” as well as in multiple sections of Oaklawn Ceremony, including a 25-by-30-foot trench.


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